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arrow Facts & Figures

Diabetes Facts & Figures

05 February 2007
The Dangerous Toll Of Diabetes

Today, nearly 1.2 million people in Malaysia have diabetes. Unfortunately, more than half are not aware that they have the disease. About 650,000 people will be diagnosed this year.

Diabetes is the fourth-leading cause of death by disease in the United States; this year, more than 160,000 will die from the disease and its related complications.

Diabetes is a chronic disease that has no cure.

Diabetes Is A Silent Killer

Many people first become aware that they have diabetes when they develop one of its life-threatening complications.

  • Blindness

  • Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in people ages 25-74. Each year, from 15,000 to 39,000 people lose their sight because of diabetes.

  • Kidney Disease

  • Ten percent of all people with diabetes develop kidney disease. In 1990, more than 13,000 people initiated treatment for end-stage renal disease (kidney failure) because of diabetes.

  • Amputations

  • Diabetes is the most frequent cause of non-traumatic lower limb amputations. The risk of a leg amputation is 27.7 times greater for a person with diabetes. Each year, 54,000 people lose their foot or leg to diabetes.

  • Heart Disease And Stroke

  • People with diabetes are 2 to 4 times more likely to have heart disease (more than 77,000 deaths due to heart disease annually). And, they are 5 times more likely to suffer a stroke, with more than 11,000 deaths each year.

    Direct And Indirect Costs Of Diabetes

    Diabetes is a major health problem. Health care and related costs for treatment, as well as the cost of lost productivity, run nearly $92 billion annually in the United States.

    What Are The Complications Of Diabetes?

    With its complications, diabetes is the fourth leading cause of death by disease in the United States.

    Each year, more than 160,000 people die as a result of diabetes and its complications.

  • Blindness due to diabetic retinopathy.

  • Each year 15,000 to 39,000 people lose their sight because of diabetes. Diabetes is the leading cause of new blindness in people ages 25-74.

  • Kidney Disease due to diabetic nephropathy.

  • Ten percent of all people with diabetes develop kidney disease. Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease, a condition where the patient requires dialysis or a kidney transplant in order to live.

  • Heart Disease and Stroke.

  • People with diabetes are 2 to 4 times more likely to have heart disease (more than 77,000 deaths due to heart disease annually). And, they are 5 times more likely to suffer a stroke, with more than 1,000 deaths each year.

  • Nerve damage due to diabetic neuropathy.

  • Approximately 50 percent of all those who have diabetes for over 25 years have evidence of nerve damage. This can lead to loss of feeling, muscular weakness, amputation, and impotence.

  • Amputations.

  • Diabetes is the most frequent cause of non-traumatic lower limb amputations. The risk of a leg amputation is 27.7 times greater for a person with diabetes.

  • Impotence due to diabetic neuropathy or artery blockage.

  • Impotence afflicts more than one-third of all men who have diabetes.

    The Direct And Indirect Costs Of Diabetes In The United States

    The total annual economic cost of diabetes is estimated at $91.8 billion in 1992 ($45.2 billion -- direct medical costs -- and $46.6 billion -- the value of productivity foregone due to disability and premature death).

    The total annual economic cost of diabetes in 1987 was estimated at $20.4 billion.
    Diabetes' Direct Costs:

    Estimated at $45.2 billion in 1992.

    Represents 5.8 percent of total personal health-care expenditures in the U.S.; however, diagnosed diabetes patients account for only 2.8 percent of the total U.S. civilian population.

    Represented 2.2 percent of total personal health-care expenditures in 1987.

    $39.1 billion (more than 86 percent) was spent on institutional care -- $37.2 billion for hospital care and $1.8 billion for nursing home care.

    Diabetes-related hospitalizations totalled 371,969 in 1992.

    The mean length of stay was 6.2 days.

    Patients with diabetic complications (heart and kidney disease, stroke, blindness, amputation) are hospitalised 2.8 days longer on average than non diabetic patients with the same complications.

    Nearly two-thirds of all hospitalisations were for diabetic patients less than 65 years old.

    Diabetic patients are at a 1.5 times greater risk to be hospitalised than non diabetic patients.

    Diabetic patients are 11.7 times more likely to be hospitalised because of amputations.
    Diabetes' Indirect Costs:

    Productivity losses were estimated at $46.6 billion in 1992.

    Foregone productivity attributable specifically to diabetes is estimated at $26.9 billion in 1992.

    A total of 1 million work-loss days were attributable to diabetes in 1992.

    Three-quarters lost by diabetes patients 45 to 65 years old.

    A total of 47,800 workers were reported to be permanently disabled because of diabetes in 1992.

    Diabetes was the underlying cause of death for 48,259 people in 1992.

    Cardiovascular disease was the underlying cause of death of nearly 60 percent of deaths among people with diabetes.

    Diabetes appeared as a contributory cause of death on an estimated 118,678 death certificates in 1992.


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